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9/14/2005

 
DURHAM, NC PRESENTS... TWIP - LOUDER THAN WORDS

"I'm an entertainer, but I'm also a producer. So I don't like to be tagged. You can call me whatever you want. But you need to hear my music."

TWIP
Louder Than Words
In Stores October 2005
ICED Records
twipmusic.com

Includes collaborations with Lil Jon, Lil' Flip, Deemi (Atlantic Records) and Campus Hills.

Features producers Megahertz (Nas, Puff Daddy, Jay- Z, 50 Cent), Midi Mafia (50 Cents 21 Questions) and Chris Styles and Osinachi Nwaneri for Dangerous LLC ("Disco Inferno").

Listen to "The Joint (Let's Go)" produced by Chris Styles and Osinachi Nwaneri for Dangerous LLC here: http://www.twipmusic.com/media/real/Th e_Joint_Full.ram

ABOUT TWIP
Adding his voice to the storied canon of the Dirty South is Durham, North Carolina native Twip. The young rapper/producer has long been a fixture on the Carolina rap circuit, opening up for such established talents as the Ruff Ryders, Pastor Troy and T.I. Now with the upcoming release of his buzz-heavy debut Louder Than Words, Twip is ready to bring his brand of anthemic hip-hop to a national stage. "When you hear my album you are going to hear that funk," explains the energetic MC, whose lyrical style is as disarmingly melodic, with its bluesy sing-song delivery, as it is sneeringly aggressive. The Durham MC says, "I'm an entertainer, but I'm also a producer. So I don't like to be tagged. You can call me whatever you want. But you need to hear my music."

Twip's diverse jack-of-all-trades production skills and lyrical showmanship are apparent throughout Louder Than Words. While the album finds the ambitious MC handling the majority of the board work, established producer Megahertz (Nas, Puff Daddy, Jay- Z, 50 Cent), Midi Mafia (50 Cents 21 Questions) and Chris Styles and Osinachi Nwaneri for Dangerous LLC ("Disco Inferno"), were recruited to flesh out the bruising release. "I got with with Megahertz through a mutual friend," Twip recalls of his introduction to the respected beat man. "His sound is so rugged and live. He saw what I was doing and heard my stuff and was like, 'Hey, that's something very different, right there.' The synergy between Twip and Midi Mafia front man Bruce Wayne is also immediately apparent.

On the Mega-produced horn-driven, battle track Got This, Twip wastes no time repping his Tar Heel clique Campus Hills. The Megahertz fueled "Stage Dive" is a frenzied bounce workout that exemplifies Twip's reputation as a charismatic live performer while the heartfelt "Crabs In A Barrel," takes on haters who "act so funny, when one out of us try to grow and build." "Oh Yes," a blazing sing-along romp, finds the MC flexing plenty of crunk/southern swagger while the self-produced cautionary tale "Fast Life," details the rewards and consequences of attaining more money and power over a relentless marching track that features hard boiled Campus Hills member Six 6. For Twip, the unified theme throughout songs like "Crabs In a Barrel," and "Fast Life" go beyond making songs. "That's kind of my thought process in general," he says of the real life tracks. "I try to keep shit positive...I hate negativity. Everybody is pulling each other down instead of doing what the hell they can do for themselves and others. My whole thing is I just want to open doors for my people."

To say that Twip proudly represents Durham, North Carolina would be an understatement. The confident MC embodies his hardworking hometown. Raised in a lower middle-class house, Twip was enamored by his parents' record collection which included such soul giants as Earth Wind & Fire and Frankie Beverly & Maze. By the mid-'80s, hip-hop music was beginning to penetrate young America's consciousness. Twip began listening to the groundbreaking albums by EPMD, Public Enemy and Ice Cube. It was a revolutionary middle-finger. Hip hop had officially taken over. "It was because my brother Tyrone listened to it, that's what got me on it," Twip fondly recalls. "He was in high school and he had a hip hop group. I was 10-years-old, writing then. I was just mimicking what I was hearing. Of course they were not the greatest songs in the world (laughs), but they were my songs."

By 10th grade, Twip had become a confident lyricist. Twip will simply tell you there's no pressure to live up to the hype. His Campus Hills family, which includes standout MC's Cavanaugh, Six 6, and Perfect Stranger have plans of taking over the rap game. And with Twip's star-making debut, Louder Than Words, leading the way, the south will no doubt continue to be heard. "When hip hop first started coming down this way everybody was rhyming like cats from New York," he remembers. "But by the '90s the South started to get its own voice. MC's were like, 'We can sound ourselves now.'"

Please contact me for reviews and interviews
Amina Elshahawi
ICED Media
email: amina@icedmedia.com
phone: (212) 461-2188




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